Now THAT’S What I Call Bling!

Now that’s what I call Christmas Bling

I’ve had the occasion recently to try out a new line of ammo.  I have to say. I think I’m in love with www.ammoforsale.com So, here’s what I tested and how it panned out.

Magtech 9mm Luger (115gr) – These came with the standard 9mm round-nose, full-metal-jacketed bullet seated in good, reloadable brass, and appearing to use an anvil primer. I ran these through a standard Beretta 92FS (tests 1 and 2) and a standard Gen 3 Glock 17 (tests 3 and 4) with my standard battery of four-target tests, which consisted of (test 1) ten rounds of slow-fire for accuracy, (test 2) ten rounds of two-shot double-taps, (test 3) fifteen rounds of three-shot triple-taps, and, finally, (test 4) fifteen shots of slow-fire for accuracy. All rounds functioned flawlessly with no stoppages, no misfires, and no feeding problems. Though it is hard to find a round that won’t pass through these two firearms, the same can not be said for the basic accuracy of several 9mm rounds that I’ve tested. These rounds passed my accuracy test with no problems, which shows a consistency in the bullet weight, the measured powder load, and the overall cartridge length (bullet seating). Of course, your accuracy mileage may vary since the shooter is usually the weak link in the firing process. Overall, this is a cartridge I would have no problem recommending to fellow shooting enthusiasts.

Seller & Bellot .40cal (180gr) – These came with the standard .40cal snub-nose, full-metal-jacketed bullet seated in good, reloadable brass, and using a sealed boxer primer. I ran these through a standard Beretta 96FS Brigadier (tests 1 and 2) and a standard Gen 3 Glock 22 (tests 3 and 4) with my standard battery of four-target tests, which consisted of (test 1) ten rounds of slow-fire for accuracy, (test 2) ten rounds of two-shot double-taps, (test 3) fifteen rounds of three-shot triple-taps, and, finally, (test 4) fifteen shots of slow-fire for accuracy. All rounds functioned flawlessly with no stoppages, no misfires, and no feeding problems. It is hard to find a round that won’t pass through these two firearms, and these rounds were no different. The same can not be said for the basic accuracy of several .40cal rounds that I’ve tested. These rounds passed my accuracy test with no problems, which shows a consistency in the bullet weight, the measured powder load, and the overall cartridge length (bullet seating). Of course, your accuracy mileage may vary since the shooter is usually the weak link in the firing process. Overall, this is a cartridge I would have no problem recommending to fellow shooting enthusiasts.

.50cal ammo can – Sure, it’s just meant to storage ammo or other supplies, but you have to admit that most .50cal ammo cans that you see look like they’ve been on the muzzle-end of a day at the range or dragged through every available mud-hole and sandpit east of the Mississippi before getting to you. Not so with this one; repainted to look near-new; clean inside and out; this can is one that you could set on the front table as a decoration – with the right doily on top, of course. Seriously though, this can is in good shape and great working condition. If all of their cans come looking like this, I know where to find my new supplier.

I believe you’ll find a broad range of offerings, and respectable pricing. Enjoy—no really, ENJOY!

Kellene Bishop

Founder Women of Caliber/ The Preparedness Pro

A True Best Friend

By Kellene Bishop

true-best-friend-jessie-abbate

A true best friend is always by my side. Photo c/o Accurate Shooter

Will Rogers once said that strangers were friends he hadn’t met yet. With this in mind, I can’t help but wonder why it is so foreign for women to handle a firearm. Mine is definitely one of my best friends. Why?

I can trust this best friend to be reliable—to never flake out on me.

I can trust this best friend to protect my children, myself, and my loved ones.

This best friend will dependably fight for freedom and liberty for me.

I can rely on this best friend to stand for right over might.

This best friend is always available and by my side. 

This best friend strengthens my physical weaknesses against enemies, foreign or domestic.

This best friend enables me to preserve life when others may desire to take it.

Other than my husband, I have a hard time finding any other friend that I can say these things about. So ladies, my I suggest that you introduce yourself to Mr. Glock, Mr. Smith and Wesson, or any other Mr. soon and make a new friend?

Copyright 2009 Women of Caliber and Kellene Bishop. All rights reserved.  You are welcome to repost this information so long as it is credited to Women of Caliber and Kellene Bishop.

My Dirty Little Secret of Cleaning Guns

By Kellene Bishop

No one can underestimate the importance of cleaning their firearms.  However, I discovered the importance of this hard way—nearly the same way I realized that I was actually supposed to change the oil in my car as a 19-year-old.  So, I thought I’d share a little bit of information with our readers on the cleaning of firearms—particularly how I clean my Glocks the lazy woman’s way—it’s my dirty little secret of cleaning guns. 😉

Photo c/o blakeperez.net

Photo c/o blakeperez.net

The ONLY rule related to cleaning your firearms is to do so with safety in mind!  Far too many foolish accidents have occurred because folks got careless in their safety checks prior to cleaning their guns.  You should always check the chamber/magazine well for cartridges, in front of the primer pin, and down the barrel—looking down from the action port—not from the front of the barrel.  All three of these checks should be visible by opening the action.  You should NEVER look down the barrel of a gun—and if you do happen to, I hope you’re a quick shot.  This is a necessary three-point check that I ALWAYS do prior to handling a firearm in the classroom.  I do my three-point check, hand the firearm to my assistant who also does a three-point check, and then when they return the firearm to me I do the three-point check again—WITHOUT exception.  The more famous occurrence of firearms instructor shooting himself in the leg while teaching elementary school kids about guns certainly NEVER would have happened if he had done the three-point check.  

Other than the safety rule, there really aren’t any other hard and fast rules on cleaning guns.  The bottom line is you’ve got to consult your owner’s manual.  For example, you can actually gum up an AR 15 or an M 16 if you clean it too often.  Also, if you clean firearms that have softer metal, such as the older Kimber 1911 models, then you will do some “wearing” damage as well.  Some firearms should be cleaned after every couple of uses, some rifles should be cleaned after 20-50 rounds during the breaking in period.  It really just depends on the type of gun it is.  So please, please reference your owner’s manual. 

Let me appeal to your womanly side of “yuck” for a moment to illustrate the importance of cleaning guns.

Photo c/o rd.com

Photo c/o rd.com

1)     Just as you have to have your oil changed, you must clean your firearms in order for them to operate properly.

2)     For the same reasons as you would never try to make whipped cream in your Kitchen Aid mixer that hasn’t been cleaned after making a batch of chocolate chip cookies, your gun must be kept clean.

3)     Just as you would never rely on a dirty diaper to last you 4 hours, you should never entrust your life to a dirty gun. (Guys, I hope those of you who are reading this know that) 

4)     For the same reasons why you have to clean the hair out of the drain trap, you must clean your firearm.

OK.  I think we’ve sufficiently covered that.

The oils, gases, and powder build-up in the action portion of the gun and down the barrel can even back up into the magazine well and prevent proper cycling of your cartridges.  Couple that with the oils from your hands as well as the dust and dirt around, and you’ve got the makings of a useless tool when you need it most for self-defense.  A dirty gun is useless.  All firearms should definitely be cleaned prior to putting them in long-term storage.

One of my favorite cleaning kits is the Otis cleaning kits.  I only say that because I KNOW that some of you will inevitably ask my preference.

OK.  Glock alert.  Here’s yet another reason why I love my Glocks.  I believe that if you give a lazy man an easy job, they will always find an easier way to do it.  And that is indeed the case when it comes to cleaning my Glocks.  Are you ready for my dirty little secret of cleaning guns?  I put them in the dishwasher! 

Don't try this at home, kids! Glocks in the dishwasher

Don't try this at home, kids! Glocks in the dishwasher

Yup, you read that right.  I put them in, all by themselves, with no soap or detergent of any kind.  I let them run through a complete cycle and then oil them up afterwards while I’m watching Desperate Housewives or The Closer.  Now you know my “dirty little secret” when it comes to cleaning guns. 

CAUTION: The dishwasher method is NOT appropriate for any other firearms that I know of.  So don’t attempt it.

Copyright 2009 Kellene Bishop. All rights reserved.  You are welcome to repost this information so long as it is credited to Kellene Bishop.

Selecting Your First Gun is Like Selecting a Purse

By Kellene Bishop

Selecting your first firearm is like selecting a purse—no one can really do it well for you.  As much as my husband loves me, there’s no way that he can know enough about my preferences to appropriately select a purse on my behalf.  Are the straps long enough?  Does it have enough pockets in the right places?  Does it have enough compartments?  So I beg you NOT to allow anyone else select your first gun for you.  It’s far too personal of a decision. 

If you’re purchasing your first firearm for self-defense, ideally it should be a handgun.  (I then advise you to move to a shotgun and then a rifle, but I’ll cover that in a future article.)  Here are the primary concerns you want to consider when selecting a handgun.

  1. Grip
  2. Ease of loading
  3. Ease of use (such as mechanics, ability to clear stoppages, etc)
  4. Reliability (and safety)
  5. Cost of ammo
  6. Ease of assembly/disassembly

Rather than getting caught up in all of the brand names and what kind of caliber to select, first and foremost focus on the grip of the firearm.  Try holding SEVERAL of them.  Keep in mind if the grip is metallic, even in part, it will likely impede your shooting ability in a crisis situation as sweat will hinder your grip.  I focus on a solid non-slip grip when I select my guns, or my ability to have the gun modified accordingly.

Also, when considering the grip, be sure that it is sufficient so that you can comfortably bring your other hand up to the gun for stability.  There are some guns I’ve tried holding where using the other hand only seems to confine and cramp my ability to use fire the gun appropriately.  While women are always conscious of fashion at some point, I implore you not to focus on whether or not it’s pink, black, or steel.  Focus on the holding of it THEN focus on how it simply it loads and how easily it is for you to master cocking it.  For these 3 reasons, most women go with a revolver for their first handgun or a Glock.  Out of the most common options, I would opt for a Glock simply because it holds more ammo and is very forgiving of a limp wristed shot that most women possess when they shoot—myself included.  It will shoot when it’s dirty, wet, muddy, etc.  In other words, it’s highly reliable, and that’s what any woman needs in a time of critical self-defense.

For a myriad of reasons, you really don’t want your first gun to be too light.  While you don’t want to exhaust your muscles with the weight of a gun while shooting it (like I do when shooting the AR-15 from my shoulder), I strongly advise you against purchasing a mamby-pamby gun that simply fits into the palm of your hand as your first self-defense gun.  Such firearms have their place, but not as your primary self-defense weapon.  A solid weight gun will actually help you to shoot more accurately, and it is typically made better as well.

While there is much discussion by “gun snobs” that a .9mm isn’t worthy of self-defense use, don’t pay any heed to it.  Rather than focusing on the power of the gun, focus instead on your ability to carry it easily, retrieve it, and aim and shoot it accurately.  What you DON’T want to have happen is that you buy your new gun, go shoot it, and it’s so dang powerful that you’re afraid of it and won’t continue to practice with it.  So don’t let some “guy” convince you that you need to start with a more powerful caliber.  9mm’s have done just fine in warding off intruders and assailants for years, and have even been used by law enforcement officers all over that nation for a very long time.  Sure, there are those rare circumstances in which a drugged up criminal is unphased by a .9mm hit, but I assure you he wasn’t hit dead center in the head or the heart when such was the case.  It’s not the power in your gun, it’s the skill behind it that counts.

Another reason why I prefer to train other women on a Glock is because of the lack of a visible safety. For some women this can rattle their nerves but consider this.  While the Glock actually has 3 inherent safety features, that gun is ready when you need it most, in the climax of emotion.  What I don’t want to happen is to have a woman NEED to use her firearm, unveil the element of surprise as she draws her firearm and shows she’s willing to use it on an assailant, only to be hindered because she realizes that the safety was still on.  That may be all the hesitation the criminal needs to remove the firearm from your possession and use it on you.  I never, ever want to give away my element of surprise in my self-defense actions.  If I’m pulling my firearm from my holster or its hiding place, I’m doing so for one reason and one reason only and that is to STOP an assault.

Also consider that .9 mm ammo is less expensive.  If you purchase a gun with a higher caliber shooting power, you may also be less apt to practice with it due to the cost of ammo. 

Ultimately, it doesn’t matter what brand or caliber you choose so long as you’re the last one standing, alive and well.

Copyright 2009 Kellene Bishop. All rights reserved.
You are welcome to repost this information so long as it is credited to Kellene Bishop.